Those Who Hesitate to Try The Libre 2 CGM Will Switch After Reading This Story

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Managing blood sugar levels often feels like a constant juggling act. Too high and you risk serious complications. Too low and you can experience everything from shakiness and dizziness to seizures and unconsciousness. That’s why a continuous glucose monitor that provides early warnings can be a lifesaver.

Just ask Karen, a lifelong type 1 diabetic and horse trainer. Karen’s blood sugar levels drop so quickly and so often, she used to pass out while riding her horse. But thanks to the Libre 2 alarm system, she can now be alerted early when her blood sugar levels start to drop dangerously low.

Karen’s Story

Karen grew up on a horse ranch in Colorado. As a little girl, she had a profound love for horses and got involved in training them with her dad. Karen was diagnosed with Type1 Diabetes at an early age, which meant she had to learn to take care of herself while being outside with horses. “You cannot let diabetes stop you from pursuing your love for training horses,” Karen’s dad said, always reminding her what really matters.

Karen carried on with training horses alongside her dad until she met her future husband in a barrel racing contest. Later on the two together started a small ranch of their own training horses. She continued to pursue her passion for training horses while battling diabetes and raising a family, but as the time went on her diabetes continued to get worse and presented new challenges.

Lately, Karen’s blood sugar levels dropped so quickly she lost consciousness while riding horses. At first she wasn’t sure how serious the situation was, but the repeated unconsciousness episodes caused a major concern, forcing her to reduce her training sessions. Her doctor told her to stop riding horses and recommended she start monitoring her blood sugar levels with the Libre 2 continuous glucose monitoring system.

For Karen, who frequently experiences extreme swings in her blood sugar levels, the Libre 2 system can be a game-changer, allowing her to do what she loves while staying safe.

Initially, she, like many others, was hesitant at first because she didn’t want to have to think about her diabetes while training. But after realizing it was just an extra safety measure, she decided to give it a try, and it’s been one of the best decisions she’s made.

It’s been a lifesaver—literally!

Thanks to the Libre 2 alarm system, Karen no longer has to worry about passing out while riding. If her blood sugar levels start to drop, the alarm goes off and she can take corrective action right away. She gets to be in control of her diabetes more than ever while pursuing her passion for training horses.

The Importance of Early Warnings

For some people, the extreme high or low blood sugar levels can occur without warning and often at the most inconvenient times. In such an extreme scenario the Libre 2 warning can be quite instrumental in preventing dangerous complications because it can send alerts when glucose levels start to rise or fall outside of a safe range.

The Libre 2 sensor is discreetly placed on the back of the arm and lasts for 14 days. It continually monitors glucose levels and sends an alert to the accompanying smartphone app or a reader when they start to rise or fall outside of a safe range. The reader then displays the current glucose level as well as the trends so that users can take action accordingly and make informed decisions about their health.

Conclusion

For many people like Karen, managing blood sugar levels is a constant balancing act. That’s why having a tool like the Libre 2 can be so valuable. With the Libre 2 system gives her a peace of mind to focus on what she loves—training horses.

We would like to thank Karen for allowing us to share her incredible story.

Disclaimer. The content, information, and links on this page are intended for informational and educational purposes only, and does NOT constitute any medical professional advice.

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