SEPTEMBER NEWSFEED

  • Researchers Uncover the Source of Diabetic Nerve Pain
    A new King’s College London study reveals the molecular basis of chronic nerve pain in diabetes. The findings in mice, published today in Science Translational Medicine, could one day lead to treatments which target the source of the pain.. Read the full article here: Medical Express
  • Adding Lifestyle Changes to Medication Can Deliver a Knockout Punch
    Plenty of research supports the common-sense notion that a healthy lifestyle can prevent or treat many diseases. A diet high in fruits, veggies, whole grains, and plant protein and low in processed carbs, added sugars, saturated fats; regular physical activity; and emotional well-being are the potent treatments that can prevent the need for or even replace many prescription medications. Read the full story here: Harvard Health Publishing
  • New Therapy Could Protect Diabetic Bones
    A drug that can reverse diabetes and obesity in mice may have an unexpected benefit: strengthening bones. Experiments with a compound called TNP (2,4,6-trinitrophenol, which is also known as picric acid), which researchers often use to study obesity and diabetes, show that in mice the therapy can promote the formation of new bone. That’s in contrast to many diabetes drugs currently in wide use that leave patients’ bones weaker. If TNP has similar effects in humans, it may even be able to stimulate bone growth after fractures or prevent bone loss due to aging or disuse. Read the full article here: Science Magazine
  • Fracture Risk Higher for Seniors With Diabetes
    Seniors with type 2 diabetes may be at increased risk for fractures. And researchers think they know why. “Our findings identify skeletal deficits that may contribute to excess fracture risk in older adults with diabetes and may ultimately lead to new approaches to improve prevention and treatment,” said Samelson, of Hebrew SeniorLife’s Institute for Aging Research in Boston. Read full story here: WebMD.
Disclaimer. The content, information, and links on this page are intended for informational and educational purposes only, and does NOT constitute any medical professional advice.

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