TAZ SAYS ‘YES’ TO ORAL HEALTH

oral-health-for-diabetes

Dear friend,

Tell me about your teeth. I am interested in learning how often you get them checked for cavity or decay. You might think this is an odd question, but do you drink coffee? And if so, how do you take it, with lots of sugar like I used to do?

You know, as a furry, carnivorous animal whose teeth are designed for killing small prey, I have learned that in order to survive I must take good care of my teeth, even though that’s really not my thing. Frankly I hate it! Anyways, I have decided to keep them nice and clean; not obviously for hunting anymore, because I have a fantastic job here at Diabetic Outlet and I get served great food that does not require razor-sharp teeth, but because I have diabetes. So, I say “YES” to oral health, and so should you my fellow readers.

As a diabetic, I tend to think that all I need to worry about is my glucose levels. However, I recently learned that regular testing of blood glucose levels alone is not enough. There are several other complications that may arise from diabetes such as dental decay. Other common complications include heart disease, foot pain, and many more.

Trust me! I don’t want any of those.

To cut a long story short, if you have diabetes and your glucose levels are out-of-control, there is a very high chance that your teeth might undergo decay or cavities. Even if (hands down to you) you have your diabetes under control it’s always a great idea to get a regular dental exam done to make sure your teeth are in good condition.

Here is another problem that may arise from disobedient diabetes. Gum Disease! More common in older than young individuals, this disease destructs the supporting structure of the teeth and can often be very severe. Moreover, it may take a long time to heal. So why risk it?!

At Diabetic Outlet, we are all about avoiding oral health problems. From adopting a healthier diet, to gentle brushing of the teeth twice a day with a fluoride toothpaste, we are constantly battling oral health problems. Frankly, who knows, maybe one day I’ll need my teeth again if I lose this job and am forced to be a feral cat.

Be mindful and get your teeth regularly checked. Visit your dentist at least every 6 months.

Disclaimer. The content, information, and links on this page are intended for informational and educational purposes only, and does NOT constitute any medical professional advice.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.